Citizen Media in Morocco: The Rise of the Blogoma Generation

This month we are asking: What is the importance of Morocco’s citizen media landscape? What have been the high points? How did we get here? And where are we going?

By

5 comments

Tuesday, June 15th, 2010


The Internet first arrived in Morocco in 1995. The liberalization of the telecommunications sector in the late 90s offered the opportunity for a large number of Moroccans to access new and inexpensive communications and information technologies. The past decade, however, was marked by a steady reduction of the space of freedom where traditional media was allowed to operate. Conversely, the increasing penetration of the Internet helped shape a new kind of media: citizen media. Populated by a community of bloggers, microbloggers and online social networkers, it is increasingly becoming part and parcel of the local media landscape. This month we are asking: what is the importance of Morocco’s citizen media landscape? What have been the high points? How did we get here? And where are we going?

Swirly divider

Written by

Posted on Tuesday, June 15th, 2010

  • Share on Twitter
  • Facebook
  • E-mail
  • Google Reader
  • Permalink

5 comments on “Citizen Media in Morocco: The Rise of the Blogoma Generation”

  1. And more than a “couple of day” later, still nothing. How very Moroccan of you!


    • Jillian York

      Hakada,

      Our apologies, but we should have the essays up today or tomorrow. Both Hisham and I have been without regular Internet access these past few days.

      Now where’s your apology for insulting Moroccans?

      -Jillian


  2. Dear ‘hakada’

    first of all, your comment is insulting to all the Moroccans. You are one of them I guess.

    Second, please consider that our moderators are doing very hard job editing and translating, and Talkmorocco is neither their full time occupation nor their income resource ! in addition that we (the contributors) are having more or less difficulties to respect the deadlines (none of us is a full time blogger as I know).

    So just be patient, I am sure you will read the contributions very soon :)

    Best regards
    Mahdi.


  3. Jill,

    I respect the time and effort you and Hisham are putting in this little project. I might not agree with the editorial line’s blatant moral relativism and (relative) complacency towards the reigning feodal system, but rest assured that I admire your work and dedication. My comment was a cheap shot, but your apology is greatly appreciated nonetheless. However, I am not about to cave to political correctness and apologize for offending the nationalist touchy-feely crowd. They’re more than happy to think of themselves in collective terms when the stereotypes are positive, so let ’em realize that it goes both ways. Nationalists are nothing but scum, and if they felt insulted by a derogatory stereotype , then I congratulate myself for making it. Anyway, I’m looking forward to reading the next batch of entries, and I wish you and Hisham a pleasant summer.
    Best,

    hakada wla fala


Leave a comment:

You can use the following XHTML tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Comment moderation is enabled. Your comment may take some time to appear.


Pingbacks

Swirly cluster